Always Check ID! 3 Reno Businesses Fail Alcohol Compliance Check

pub crawlImagine this: you are serving beverages to customers, just like any other day. A younger couple visits your establishment and orders two pints of beer. You size them up and they seem sober and confident, but they look like they might be a little young. Think fast – what do you do? Ask to see I.D., or make the sale and send them on their way? If you chose option number two, you would have failed the test.

This past Saturday three businesses were cited for serving minors. The Reno area’s Regional Street Enforcement Team conducts regular alcohol compliance and TAM Card checks. On Saturday, the Team sent four 18-20-year-old volunteers out to attempt alcohol purchases at 22 area businesses. This time around, three of those businesses made sales to the minors. These volunteers were given instructions to show their actual state-issued I.D. if they were asked for it, clearly identifying them as underage, according to authorities.

The penalties can be severe. In Nevada, serving alcohol to a minor and allowing a minor into a bar are misdemeanors, with a pre-designated fine of $500. Now, think about your training. Would you pass an alcohol compliance check? Here are some tips for keeping things safe and legal:

  • Get your mandatory TAM® Card and alcohol awareness training. TAM® will train you on how to correctly check identification and how to spot fake, borrowed, or altered ID. Police officers may ask to see your alcohol awareness card during an alcohol compliance check, so it is important to be prepared.
  • Check ID very carefully, and look for any inconsistencies. Watch for anyone who seems either nervous, or over confident. When checking the birth date of a customer, don’t rely only on the birth year alone to confirm someone is of legal drinking age. Minors may try to pull a fast one on busy or distracted workers by purchasing alcohol just a few months or weeks shy of their 21st birthdays. As evidenced by this recent operation, doing the math correctly is very important.

Every establishment needs policies to prevent alcohol sales to minors, and to protect themselves from liability, and the public from harm. Tell us in the Comments below – how else do you think service workers can help curb teen drinking?

Resources

Advertisements

With College Students Returning to Campus for the Fall Semester, Be Extra Vigilant in Checking ID’s

teen drinkingUnderage drinking is a serious concern in Nevada, and police agencies across the state are working to remind retailers, alcohol servers, and teens that if they do not abide by the laws, they will face consequences. Students are returning to classes for the Fall semester. Many young adults are moving in to dorms and living on their own for the first time. For many, that means a new sense of freedom.

Many students will be busy adjusting to their new schedules, making new friends, and in many cases, partying around and off campus.  A report from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration indicates that almost 38% of young adults Nevada have engaged in binge drinking (SAMHSA). If you work selling or serving alcoholic beverages, be on the lookout for underage drinkers, and make sure to always check for valid identification. Additionally, remember to keep a close eye on patrons and make sure no one is over-served. Even adults ages 21 and over need to be monitored closely to keep things safe. For more tips on stopping underage drinkers, read our blog post, “A Dangerous Cocktail –Teen Drinking.”

Police are stepping up their patrols around the state. Don’t forget, alcohol education in mandatory in both Clark and Washoe counties. In addition to online and classes in Las Vegas, TAM® of Nevada is able to conduct alcohol awareness online course proctoring in Reno, and offers courses for individuals once a month in Mesquite.

We’re Moving! TAM® of Nevada Welcomes You to Our New Office in Las Vegas

tam officeAs you may have heard, a massive fire recently destroyed the TAM office. Beginning Monday, August 5th, TAM® of Nevada will be moving to our new office. Don’t worry, we aren’t going far! You can find us less than half a mile from our old office on Paradise Road, between Flamingo and Twain.

Our new address is 3993 Howard Hughes Parkway, Suite 320, Las Vegas, NV 89169.

Convenient parking is available in front of the building. There is additional parking available in the parking garage structure that is to the right of our buildings at 3883 Howard Hughes. To find our office, take the elevator to 3rd floor, and you’ll see our suite on the right side of Robert Half.

We will be returning to our regular business hours beginning Monday, August 5th. You may visit us for final exams and TAM Cards between 8:30am-5:00pm Monday through Friday and 9:00am-12:30pm Saturday.

Classroom training with our expert instructors will resume at a later date. Stay tuned for an updated classroom training schedule in the next few weeks.

The online alcohol awareness course is still available 24/7 at www.tamnevada.com.

We look forward to seeing you in person at our new office. Visit us on Facebook and Instagram to see photos of our new space!

Who Needs a TAM® Card?

TAM_Card_Larger_RoundAre you looking for a job in the service industry in Las Vegas, Nevada? Show employers you’re ready to get to work, and serious about finding a job, by getting your TAM® Card.

Before working in Nevada in the hotel, gaming, food and beverage industries, it may be mandatory for you to have a TAM® Card. The big question is, who exactly needs a TAM Card?

  1. Anyone, working at any venue, who sells or serves alcohol to the public.
  2. Security guards who work at those venues.
  3. Clerks and cashiers at retail stores that sell sealed alcoholic beverages.
  4. Anyone selling or serving alcoholic beverages at a festival or special event, even if it is just for one night.

Our customers often ask about age requirements too. You must be at least 16 years old to get a TAM Card. In Nevada, individuals 16 – 17 years of age may act as a cashier and ring up an order for sealed alcohol if they employed at a retail store and supervised by an adult (age 18+). To serve alcohol, a person must be 21 or older. County and city laws may be stricter.

With enforcement efforts on the rise, why risk having trouble with something like not being properly trained and certified? Local police agencies in Nevada have been increasing their decoy operations and busting establishments and their employees for selling alcohol to minors. Additionally, if someone is busted serving alcohol to a minor, one of the first things law enforcement may do is check their alcohol awareness card to verify that it is valid. Don’t wait – sign up for the only official online alcohol awareness course, and get your TAM Card today.